Sensitivity to wireless frequencies a real pain

 
 
 
 

In regards to A. Richards letter regarding wireless hydro meters, I want to state that I totally agree with his concern of making personal choices.

Several years ago I got wireless internet for my home. Eight months later my ankles and feet were so painful I could not walk more than a block. X-rays showed nothing wrong, so surgery was scheduled to fuse the bones in my feet.

All my life I had been lucky to have been a sound sleeper, but now I had insomnia for the first time in my life.

It was on the third night of not having slept, I decided to unplug everything in my house because I kept feeling constant rhythmic vibration pulses when I lay in bed or on my couch or on the floor. Actually after three nights without sleep I thought I was going mad. To my surprise, when I unplugged my wireless router, all vibration stopped.

When I phoned my internet provider, they didn't seem surprised and said that some people are more sensitive to Electromagnetic Frequencies (EMF). Researching this on the internet I found much information, including that EMF sensitivity is considered a disability in Sweden, and that employers must provide shielding for these persons.

I got rid of my wireless, installed shielded cables for my internet and am now sleeping soundly every night. My feet hardly hurt anymore and I have cancelled the surgery. I am getting my health back!

Take a look at these publications by Dr. Magda Havas, PhD, http://www.scribd.com/doc/15005811/Open-Letter-to-Parents-Teachers-School-Boards-Regarding-WiFi-Networks-in-Schools and http://www.magdahavas.com/ and http://www.magdahavas.org/ regarding wireless and EMF radiation concerns.

Wireless baby monitors should be a concern for parents. Maybe that's why the baby is crying?

Out of necessity I have a cell phone, but try not to carry it too close to my body or I turn it off when not in use.

We seem to have forgotten that in the 1950s X-rays were considered harmless, and those were considerably stronger than what we use today. In the 1950s in Germany, children's feet (including mine) were x-rayed in shoe stores for every pair they tried on to see if they fit.

The radiation could be measured outside the store.

Monika Krause

Lake Cowichan